Category Archives: LOVE

The Garden of Eden represents a distorted version of awakening as a physical creature

Man and woman becomes fully operational in his and her physical body, and while awake can only sense the dream body that had earlier been so real to him and her. He or she now encounters his or her experience from within a body that is subject to gravity and to earth’s laws. He or she must use physical muscles to walk from place to place. He and she sees himself and herself suddenly, in a leap of comprehension, as existing for the first time not only apart from the environment, but apart from all of earth’s other creatures.

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The sense of separation is, in those terms, initially almost shattering. Yet man or woman is to be the portion of nature that views itself with perspective. He and she is to be the part of nature that will specialize, again, in the self-conscious use of concepts. He and she will grow the flower of the intellect — a flower that must have its deep roots buried securely within the earth, and yet a flower that will send new psychic seeds outward, not only for itself but for the rest of nature, of which it is a part.

But man and woman looked out and felt himself and herself suddenly separate and amazed at the aloneness. Now he and she must find food, where before his or her dream body did not need physical nourishment. Before, man and woman had been neither male nor female, combining the characteristics of each, but now the physical bodies also specialized in terms of sexuality. Man and woman has to physically procreate. Some lost ancient legends emphasized in a clearer fashion this sudden sexual division. By the time the Biblical legend came into being, however, historical events and social beliefs were transformed into the Adam and eve version of events.

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On the one hand, man and woman did indeed feel that he or she had fallen from a high estate, because he and she remembered that earlier freedom of dream reality — a reality in which the other creatures were still to some degree immersed. Man’s and woman’s mind, incidentally, at that point had all the abilities that we now assign to it: the great capacity for contrast of imagination and intellect, the drive for objectivity and for subjectivity, the full capacity for the development of language — a keen mind that was as brilliant in any caveman or cavewoman, say, as it is in any man or woman on a modern street.

But if man or woman felt suddenly alone and isolated, he or she was immediately struck by the grand variety of the world and its creatures. Each creature apart from himself or herself was a new mystery. He and she was enchanted also by his and her own subjective reality, the body in which he and she found himself or herself, and by the differences between himself and herself and others like him or her, and the other creatures. He and she instantly began to explore, to categorize, to point out and to name the other creatures of the earth as they came to his or her attention.

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In a fashion, it was a great creative and yet cosmic  game that consciousness played with itself, and it did represent a new kind of awareness, but I want to emphasize that each version of All That Is is unique. Each has its purpose, though that purpose cannot be easily defined in our terms. Many people ask, for example: “What is the purpose of my life?” Meaning: “What am I meant to do?” but the purpose of our life, and each life, is in its being. That being may include certain actions, but the acts themselves are only important in that they spring out of the essence of our life, which simply by being is bound to fulfill its purposes.

Man’s and woman’s dream body is still with him and her, or course, but the physical body now obscures it. The dream body cannot be harmed while the physical one can — as man and woman quickly found out as he or she transformed his and her experience largely from one to the other. In the dream body man and woman feared nothing. The dream body does not die. It exists before and after physical death. In their dream bodies men and women had watched the spectacle of animals “killing” other animals, and they saw the animals’ dream bodies emerge unscathed.

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They saw the earth was simply changing its forms, but that the identity of each unit of consciousness survived — and so, although they saw the picture of death, they did not recognize it as the death that to many people now seems an inevitable end.

Men and women saw that there must be an exchange of physical energy for the world to continue. They watched the drama of the “hunter” and the “prey,” seeing that each could contribute so that the physical form of the earth could continue — but the rabbit eaten by the wolf survived in a dream body that men and women knew was its true form. When man and woman “awakened” in his or her physical body, however, and specialized in the use of its senses, he or she no longer perceived the released dream body of the slain animal running away, still cavorting on the hillside. He and she retained memory of his and her earlier knowledge, and for a considerable period he or she could now and then recapture that knowledge. He and she became more and more aware of his or her physical senses, however: Some things were definitely pleasant and some were not. Some stimuli were to be sought out, and others avoided, and so over a period of time he or she translated the pleasant and the unpleasant into rough versions of good and evil.

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Basically, what made him and her feel good was good. He and she was gifted with strong clear instincts that were meant to lead him or her toward his or her own greatest development, to his and her own greatest fulfillment, in such a way that he and she also helped to bring about the highest potential of all of the other species of consciousness. His or her natural impulses were meant to provide inner directives that would guide him and her in just such a direction, so that he or she sought what was the best for himself and herself and for others.

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In some ways the overall consciousness of United States continually becomes involved with — entwined with — the consciousness of adversaries like Russia and Iran: Such consciousnesses, once created, continue to grow and to complicate themselves in new ways within our concept of “time.” Obviously, on an even larger scale of activity, the consciousnesses of all the nations of our world contribute to the challenges, and dilemmas swirling around the Middle East situation.

Our memories, feelings, and emotions are connected to the body

It is as if the experience of our life were captured on a film. In this case the film would be the body tissue, the brain’s tissue. The experiences themselves, however, would exist independently of the film, which in any case could not capture their entirely.

In a manner of speaking the activity of our brain adjusts the speed with which we, as a physical creature, perceive life’s events. Theoretically, those events could be slowed down or run at a quicker pace. Again in a manner of speaking, the sound, vision, dimensional solidarity and so forth are “Dubbed in. ” The picture runs at the same speed, more or less. The physical senses chime in together to give us a dramatic sensual chorus, each “voice” keeping perfect time with all the other sensual patterns so that as a rule there is harmony and a sense of continuity, with no embarrassing lapses.

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The same applies to our thoughts, which if we bother to listen seem to come smoothly one after another, more or less following the sequence of exterior activity. The brain like the movie screen gives us a physical picture, in living stereo, of inner activities that nowhere themselves physically appear.

Our brain gives us a handy and quite necessary reference system with which to conduct corporal life. It puts together for us in their “proper” sequences events that could be experienced in many other ways, using other kinds of organization. The brain, of course, and other portions of the body, tune into our planet and connect us with numberless time sequences — molecular, cellular, and so forth — so that they are synchronized with the world’s events.

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The brain organizes activity and translates events, but it does not initiate them. Events have an electromagnetic reality that is then projected onto the brain for physical activation. Or instruments only pick up certain levels of the brain’s activity. They do not perceive the mind’s activity at all, except as it is imprinted onto the brain.

Even dreams are so imprinted. When one portion or one half of the brain is activated, for example, the corresponding portion of the other half is also activated, but at levels scientists do not perceive. It is ridiculous to call one side or the other of the brain dominant, for the full richness of the entire earth experience requires utilization of both halves, as does dreaming.

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In dreaming, however, the full sense-picture usually projected by the brain, and reinforced by bodily action, is not necessary. Those dream experiences often seem out of joint or out of focus in morning’s hindsight, or in retrospect, simply because they occur with a complexity that the brain could not handle in ordinary waking terms.

The body obviously must react in our official present; hence the brain neatly keeps its physical time sequences with spaced neural responses. The entire package of physical reality is dependent upon the senses’ data being timed — synchronized — giving the body an opportunity for precise action. In dreams the senses are not so restrained. Events from past, present, and future can be safely experienced, as can events that would be termed probable from our usual viewpoint, since the body, again, is not required to act upon them.

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Because of the brain’s necessary specifications, large portions of our own greater reality cannot appear through its auspices. The brain might consider such extracurricular activity as background noise or clutter that it could not decipher. It is the mind, then, as the brain’s non-physical counterpart, that decides what data will activate the brain in that regard. The so-called ancient portions of the brain among them the brainstem — limbic system contain “the mind’s memories.” Generally speaking, this means important data to which, however, no conscious attention need be given.

None could be given, because the information deals with time scales that the more “sophisticated” portions of the brain can no longer handle.

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The knowledge of the body’s own biological probabilities takes place at those ancient levels, and at those levels there is activity that results in a cellular communication existing between all species. The brain has built-in powers of adaptation to an amazing degree, so that innately one portion can take over for any other portion, and perform its activities as well as its own. Beliefs in what is possible and not possible often dull that facility, however. While the neural connections are specific, and while learned biological behavior dominates basically, the portions of the brain are innately inter-changeable, for they are directed by the mind’s action.

This is most difficult to explain, but the capacity for full conscious life is inherent in each portion of the body itself. Otherwise, in fact, it’s smooth synchronically would be impossible. The brain has abilities we do not use consciously because our beliefs prevent us from initiating the proper neural habits. Certain portions of the brain seem dominant only because of those neural habits that are adopted in any given civilization or time. But other cultures in our past have experienced reality quite differently as a result of encouraging different neural patterns, and putting experience together through other focuses.

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Dreaming, for example, can be “brought into focus” in a far sharper fashion, so that at least some of those experiences can be consciously utilized. When this happens, we are consciously taking advantage of experience that is physically and logically extra-curricular.

We are bringing into our consciousness traces of events that have not been registered in the same way that waking events are by the brain. The dream events are partially brain-recorded, but the brain separates such experience from waking events. Dreams can provide us with experience that in a manner of speaking, at least, is not encountered in time. The dream itself is recorded by the brain’s time sequences, but in the dream itself there is a duration of time “that is timeless.”

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Theoretically, certain dreams can give us a lifetime’s experience to draw upon, though the dream itself can take less than an hour in our time. In a way, dreams are the invisible thickness of our normal consciousness. They involve both portions of the brain. Many dreams do activate the brain in a ghostly fashion, sparking responses that are not practically pertinent in ordinary terms. That is, they do not require direct action but serve as anticipators of action, reminders to the brain to initiate certain actions in its future.

Dreams are so many-leveled that a full discussion requires an almost impossible verbal expertise. For while dreams do not necessitate action on the part of the whole body, and while the brain does not register the entire dream, the dream does serve to activate biological action — by releasing hormones, for example.

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There are also what I will call body dreams. No consciousness, to whatever degree, is fully manifested in matter. There is always constant communication between all portions of the body, but when the conscious mind is diverted that activity often increases. Cellular consciousness at its own level then forms a body dream. These do not involve pictures or words, but are rather like the formations of electromagnetic intent, anticipating action to be taken, and these may then serve as initiators of therapeutic dreams, in which “higher” levels of consciousness are psychologically made aware of certain conditions.

Many problems, however, are anticipated through body dreams, and conditions cleared at that level alone.

Physical events are the end products of non-physical properties

The formation of events is initially an emotional, psychic, or psychological function. Events are physical interpretations, conventionalized versions of inner perceptive experience that are then “coalesced” in space and time. Events are organized according to laws that involve, belief, intent, and the intensities with which these are entertained.

Events are attracted or repelled by us according to our loves, beliefs, intents, and purposes. Our world provides a theater in which certain events can or cannot occur. Wars, violence, disasters — these are obviously shared by many, and are a part of our shared psychological and physical environment.

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Some people encounter war directly, however, in terms of hand-to-hand combat, or bombing. Others are only inconvenienced by it. Here the mass shared environment is encountered as physical reality according to individual belief, love, and intent. In the deepest meaning there is no such thing as a victim, either of war, poverty, or disease. This does not mean that war, poverty, and disease could not be combatted, for in the terms of conventional understanding it certainly appears that men and women are victims in many such cases. Therefore they behave like victims, and their beliefs reinforce such experience.

Our beliefs form our reality, and this means that our beliefs structure the events we experience.

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Such experience then convinces us more thoroughly of the reality we perceive until a vicious circle is formed, in which all events mirror beliefs so perfectly that no leeway seems to appear between the two.

If this were really the case, however, mankind’s history would never change in any true regard. Alternate paths of experience — new possibilities and intuitive solutions — constantly appear in the dream state, so that man and woman’s learning is not simply dependent upon a feedback system that does not allow for the insertion of creative material. Dreaming then provides the species with learning experience not otherwise available, in which behavior and events can be judged against more developed and higher understanding that present in conventional daily reality at any level.

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There may be, for example, complications arising from a person’s intents, loves, and desires that cause the individual to seek certain events that his of her very beliefs make impossible. Current experience will provide a dilemma in which desired goal seems impossible.

In such instances a dream, or a series of them, will often then alter the person’s beliefs in a way that could not otherwise occur, by providing new information. The same data might come in a state of inspiration, but it would in any case be the result of an acquisition of knowledge otherwise inaccessible. Love, purpose, belief, and intent — these shape our physical body and work upon it and with it even as at other levels cellular consciousness forms it.

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Love is a biological as well as a spiritual characteristic. Basically, love and creativity are synonymous. Love exists without an object. It is the impetus by which all being becomes manifest. Desire, love, intent, belief and purpose — these form the experience of our body and all the events it perceives. We cannot change one belief but it alters our body experience. The great give-and-take between biological and psychological integrity occurs constantly. Our thoughts are as active as our cells, and as important in maintaining our physical being.

Our thoughts are also as natural as our cells. Our thoughts propel us toward survival and growth also, and in the same way that cells do. If we find oneself in physical difficulties health-wise, we cannot say: “Why doesn’t my body stop me and assert its own wisdom?” Because in the truest sense there is no division between our thoughts and our body. Our thoughts multiply even as our cells do. Our thinking is meant to ensure our survival in those terms, as much as our body mechanism.

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The give-and-take between the two occurs largely in the dream state, where constant translations of data occur. Our thoughts and our body cells are reflected one in the other.

I am going to suggest a series of exercises. They should be regarded as creative exuberant games. They will acquaint us with our psyche, or our own greater experience of oneself, by helping us shift our attention to aspects of our own experience that usually escape our notice.

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The exercise will not work, however, in the way they are meant to if they are embarked upon with too serious an air or intent. They should be considered as creative play, though of a mental nature, and they actually consist of mental endeavors tried quite spontaneously by children. So they are not to be regarded as esoteric accomplishments. They represent the intent to discover once again the true transparent delight that we once felt in the manipulation of our own consciousness, as we looped and unlooped it like a child’s jumping rope.

The dream state is the source of all physical events, in that it provides the great creative framework from which we choose our daily actuality.

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Children quickly learn their parents that experience must be structured in a certain conventional pattern. In their own periods of imaginative play, however, children utilize dream events, or events perceived in dreams, while clearly realizing that these are not considered actual in the “real” world.

Physical play is pleasant, and accompanied by high imaginative activity. Muscles and mind are both exercised. The same kind of activity occurs in the child’s dream state as it learns to handle events before they are physically encountered. Intense dream activity is involved. Some dream events are more real to the child than some waking events are — not because the child does not understand the nature of experience, but because he or she is still so close to the emotional basis behind events. Some of the exercises will put us in touch with the ways events are formed.

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Children’s play, creativity, and dreams all involve us with the birth of events in the most direct of fashions. The games that we play or habitually observe will, of course, tell us much about the kind of organization that occurs in our own experience. Overall, we organize events around certain emotions. These can be combative, in which there will always be good teams and bad teams, salvation or destruction, winning or losing.

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The events of our life will follow a similar structure. Before conditioning, children’s play follows the love of performance, of body or imagination, for performance’s sake only; the expansion of mental or physical abilities. The most satisfying of events involve those characteristics. The exercises will have to do with the natural joyful manipulation of the imagination that children employ.

The Multidimensional Theater

Pretend that you are a fine actor, playing in a multidimensional theater, so that each role you take attains a vitality far surpassing the creative powers of any ordinary play.

Each of us is embarked upon such an endeavor. We lose ourselves in our parts. We are involved in a kind of creative dilemma, since in a manner of speaking we confuse ourselves as the actor with the character we play so convincing that we are fooled.

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We say: “I must maintain my individuality after death, ” as if after the play the actor playing Hamlet stayed in that role, refused to study other parts or go on in his career, and said: “I am Hamlet, forever bound to follow the dilemmas and the challenges of my way. I must upon maintaining my individuality.

In the dream sate the actors become aware to some extent of the parts they play, and sense the true personal identity that is behind the artist’s craft. It is important to remember that we impose a certain kind of “artificial” sense of exaggerated continuity even to the self we know. Our experience changes constantly, and so does the intimate context of our life — but we concentrate upon points of order, in our terms, that actually serve to scale down the context of our experience to make it more comprehensible. There are no such limits naturally set about our consciousness.

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We have a mass psychological environment that forms our worldly culture, and corresponds to a worldly stage set in which experience than occurs. Certain psychological conventions act as props. There are, then, more or less formal psychological arrangements that are used as reference points, or settings. We group our experience within those arrangements. They serve to shape mental events as we physically perceive them.

In our lifetimes our experience must be physically felt and interpreted. Despite this, however, events spring from a non-physical source. Our recalled dreams are already interpretations of other non-physical events.

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Putting it simply, our actual experience is far too vast for us to physically follow. Our particular kind of consciousness is the result of specialized focus within a particular area. We imagine it to be “absolute,” in that it seems to involve an all-exclusive state that includes our identity as we think of it — only we give it boundaries like a kingdom. It is, instead, a certain kind of organization that is indeed inviolate even while it in itself a portion of other kinds of consciousnesses, with their own points of focus. Our body itself is composed of self-aware organizations of consciousness that escape our notice and deal with perceptual material utterly alien to our own ways.

There are affiliations of a most “sophisticated” fashion that leap even the boundaries of the species. We look upon our cultural world with its art and manufacture, its cities, technology, and the cultivated use of the intellectual mind. We count our religions, sciences, archaeologies, and triumphs over the environment, and it seems to us that no other consciousness has wrought what man’s and woman’s has produced. Those “products” of our consciousness are indeed unique, creative, and form a characteristic mosaic that has its own beauty and elegance.

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There are organizations of consciousness, however, that leapfrog the species, that produce no arts or sciences per se — yet these together form the living body of the earth and the physical creatures thereon. Their products are the seas upon which we sail our ships, the skies through which our airplanes fly, the land upon which our cities sprawl, and the very reality that makes our culture, or any culture, possible.

Man and Woman are a part of that trans-species consciousness also, as are the plants and animals. Also, part of man’s and woman’s reality contributes to that trans-species organization, but he or she has not chosen to focus his or her practical daily consciousness in that direction, or to identify his or her individuality with it. As a result he or she does not understand that greater natural mobility he or she possesses, nor can he or she practically perceive the natural psychological gestalts of which he or she is a part, that form all of our natural — meaning physical — world.

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In dreams this relationship often is revealed. The truth behind such relationships is inherent in all God-Man, God-Woman, Animal-Man, or Animal-Woman legends and mythology. There are connections, then, between man, woman and the animals and the so-called gods, that hint at psychological and natural realities.

Any section of the land has an identity, so to speak, and I am not talking symbolically. Such identities represent the combined organizations of consciousness of land, man, woman, and animal, within any given realm. Simply enough put, there are as many kinds of consciousness as there particles, and these are combined in infinite fashions. In the dream sate some of that experience, otherwise closed to us, forms the background of the dream drama. Our consciousness is not one thing like a flashlight, that we possess. It is instead a literally endless conglomeration of points of consciousness, swarming together to form our validity — stamped, as it were, with our identity.

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Whether dispersed, concentrated in a tight grouping, appearing “alone” or flying through other larger swarms, that particular organization represents our identity.

Using an analogy, its “particles” could be dispersed throughout the universe, with galaxies between, yet the identity would be retained. So unknowingly, now, portions of our consciousness mix and merge with those of other species without jarring our own sense of individuality one whit — yet forming other psychological realities upon which we do not concentrate.

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In the dream state, animals, men, women, and plants merge their realities to some extent so that information belonging to one species is transferred to others in an inner communication and perception otherwise unknown in our world.

The body reacts to information about the environment.

Information which we are not consciously concerned. That same information is highly important to the body’s integrity, however, and therefore to our own mental stance.

On cellular levels the body has a picture not only of its own present condition, but of all those aspects of the physical environment that affect its own condition. In its own codified fashion it is not only aware of local weather conditions, for example, but of all those world patterns of weather upon which the local area is dependent. It then prepares itself ahead of time to meet whatever challenges of adjustment will be necessary. It weighs probabilities; it reacts to pressures of various kinds.

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We are aware of pressure through touch, but in another version of that sense entirely, the cells react to air pressure. The body knows to the most precise degree the measurements involving radiation of all kinds. At one level, the body itself has a picture of reality of its own, upon which our conscious reality must be based — and yet the body’s terms of recognition or knowledge exist in terms so alien to our conscious ones as to be incomprehensible. Our conscious order, therefore, rides upon this greater circular kind of knowledge.

Generally speaking, the psyche has the same kind of instant overall comprehension of psychological events and environments as our body has of physical ones. It is then aware of our overall psychological climate; locally, as it involves us personally, and in world terms.

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Our actions take place with such seeming smoothness that we do not realize the order involved. A volcanic eruption in one corner of the world will ultimately affect the entire earth in varying degrees. An emotional eruption will do the same thing on another level, altering the local area primarily but also sending out its ripples into the mass psychological environment. The psyche’s picture of reality, then, would be equally incomprehensible to the conscious mind because of the intense focus upon singularity that our usual consciousness requires.

Our dreams often give us glimpses, however, of the psyche’s picture of reality in that regard.

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We become aware of probabilities, as actions sometimes that seem to have no connection with our own, but which are still related to them in that greater scheme of interaction that ordinarily we do not comprehend.

When we grow from a baby to an adult we do not just grow tall: we grow all about oneself, adding weight and thickness as well. To some extent events “grow” in the same fashion, and from the inside out, as we do. In a dream we are closer to those stages in which events are born. In our terms they emerge from the future and from the past, and are given vitality because of creative tension that exists between what we think of as our birth and our death. We make sentences out of alphabet of our language. We speak these or write them, and use them to communicate. Events can be considered in the same fashion, as psychological sentences put together from the alphabet of the senses — experience sentences that are lived instead of written, formed into perceived history instead of just being penned, for example, into a book about history.

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Our language to some extent programs our experience. There is a language of the senses, however, that gives us biological perception, experience, and communication. It forms the nature of the events that we can perceive. It puts experience together so that it is physically felt. All of our written or verbal languages have to be based upon this biological “alphabet.” There is far greater leeway here than there is in any of our spoken or written languages.

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I use the word “cord” to express the source out of which such languages spring. There are many correlations of course between our language and our body. Our spoken language is dependent upon our breath, and even written language is dependent upon the rapidity with which messages can leap the nerve endings. Biological cords then must be the source for physical languages, but the cords themselves arise from the psyche’s greater knowledge as it forms the physical mechanism to begin with.

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Dreams are a language of the psyche, in which man’s and woman’s nature merges in time and out of it. Man and woman have sense experiences. He/she runs, though he or she lies in bed. He/she shouts though no word is spoken. He/she still has the language of the flesh, and yet that language is only opaquely connected with the body’s mechanisms. He/she deals with events, yet they do not happen in his or her bedroom, or necessarily in any place that he or she can find upon awakening.

The physical world implies the existence of God

God’s existence also implies the existence of a physical world.

This statement implies the unstated, and the reverse also applies.

To deny the validity or importance of the individual is, therefore also to deny the importance or validity of God, for the two exist one within the other, and we cannot separate them.

From one end of reality we shout: “Where is God?” and from the other end the answer comes: “I am Me.” From the other end of reality, God goes shouting: “Who am I?” and finds himself in us. We are therefore a part of the source, and so is everything else manifest. Because God is, we are. Because we are, God is.

On a conscious level certainly we are not all that God is, for that is the unstated, un-manifest portion of oneself. Our being rides upon that unstated reality, as a letter of the alphabet rides upon the inner organizations that are implied by its existence. In those terms our unstated portions “reach backwards to Source called God,” as various languages can be traced back to their source. Master language can be compared to the historic gods. Each person alive is a part of the living God, supported in life by the magnificent power of nature, which is God, translated into the elements of the earth and the universe.