Category Archives: Dreams

The Human Consciousness And Relationship To The Body

We know that we have a conscious mind, of course. We also possess what is often called the subconscious, and this merely consists of feelings, thoughts or experiences that are connected to our conscious mind, but would be considered excess baggage if we had to be aware of them all of the time. Otherwise they would vie for our attention, and interfere with the present decisions that are so important.

If we tried to hold all of those subconscious memories uppermost in our mind all of the time, then we would literally be unable to think or act in the present moment at all. We do more or less have a certain access to our own subconscious mind, however. It is perhaps easier to imagine a continuum of consciousness, for we have a body consciousness also, and that body consciousness is itself made up of the individual consciousness of each molecule that forms all parts of the body itself.

It is sometimes fashionable to say that men and women have conscious minds, subconscious minds, and unconscious minds — but there is no such thing as an unconscious mind. The body consciousness is highly conscious. We are simply not usually conscious of it. Reasoning takes time. It deals with problem-solving — it forms an hypothesis, and then seeks to prove it by trial and error.

If we had to use that kind of process before we could move a muscle, we would get nowhere at all, of course. The other portions of our consciousness, then, deal with a kind of automatic thinking, and operate with a kind of knowledge that takes no time in our terms.

We might say that the varying portions of our own consciousness operate at several different speeds. Translations between one portion of consciousness and another goes on constantly, so that in formation is translated from one “speed” to another. Perhaps we can begin to understand, then, that the whole picture of health or illness must be considered from many more viewpoints than we might earlier have supposed. Many of us have been saturated by conventional, distorted ideas concerning health and illness in general. We might think, for example, of the body being invaded by viruses, or attacked by a particular disease, and these ideas, then, may make us question. We might well wonder why the body consciousness does not simply rise up and cast off any threatening diseases: why would the body allow certain cells to go berserk, or outgrow themselves? The very concept of the immunity system suggests, at least, the disease invader against which the body’s immunity system must or should surely defend itself.

We usually think of our conscious mind as our ego. It is directed toward action in physical life. Many schools of thought seem to have the curious ideas that the ego is inferior to other portions of the self, or “selfish,” and imagine it to be definitely of a lower quality than the inner self, of the soul.

In the first place, it is really impossible to separate portions of the self, and we make such distinctions only in an effort to explain the many facets of the personality. It is generally understood, then, that we do have an ego, directed toward exterior activity, and in those terms we also have an inner ego. It is also conscious, and is the director of all automatic interior activity.

Most people do not realize that they can indeed have access to this inner awareness. This inner ego or inner self should not be thought of as superior to our ordinary mind. It should not be thought of, really, as something separate from our ordinary mind. Our ego and our ordinary consciousness bring into focus all of our physical experiences, and make possible the brilliant preciseness of physical experience.

It is true that physical life represents only one condition of being. We have other kinds of existence, then. The conscious mind is one brilliant segment of our larger consciousness, but it is composed of the same universal energy and vitality that composes all consciousness. There are ways of communicating with the inner ego or inner self, however, and we will discuss some of these in future blogs. It is important, again, to remember that this inner ego or inner self uses a process that is far swifter than reasoning.

When such communications are made, therefore, they often consist of inspiration, intuition, impulses, and deal with feeling far more than with usual logical thinking.

Each person is a vital, conscious portion of the universe. Each person, simply by being, fits into the universe and into universal purposes in a way no one else can. Each person’s existence sends its own ripples throughout time. The universe is conscious at every conceivable point of itself. Each being is an individualized segment of the universe; then, in human terms, each person is a beloved individual, formed with infinite care and love, uniquely gifted with a life like no other.

No animal considers itself a failure, obviously. People, however, often identify with their seeming mistakes, forgetting their abilities in other directions, so that it seems that they are misfits in the universe, or in the world. The conscious mind can indeed have such thoughts because it so often tries to solve all problems on its own, until it begins to feel frightened, overburdened, and a failure in its own eyes.

The inner ego, however, always identifies with its source-identity as a beloved, individualized portions of the universe. It is aware of the universal love that is its heritage.

It is also aware of the infinite power and strength that composes the very fabric of its being. Through being made aware of these facts, the exterior ego can begin to feel a quicker sense of support and nourishment. The knowledge can let it relax, let go, so that it feels its life couched and safe, and knows itself to be indeed a beloved child of the universe, both ancient and young at once, with an identity far beyond the annals of time.

 

It is a great value, then, that each person remember this universal affiliation. Such a reminder can often allow the inner self to send needed messages of strength and love through the various levels, appearing as inspiration, dreams, or simply pure bursts of feeling. The inner ego draws instant and continuous support from the universal consciousness, and the more the exterior ego keeps that fact in mind, the greater its own sense of stability, safety, and self-esteem.

One of the attitudes detrimental to good health is that of self-condemnation, or dislike of the self. Such attitudes are unfortunately sometimes fostered by parents, schools, and religions. Feelings of self-worth, self-esteem, and pleasure with one’s abilities promote feelings of well-being, health, and exuberance.

The universe actively loves itself and all of its parts. The world loves itself and all of its parts. It is not true that energy is neutral or indifferent. Energy is active, positive, propelled by what can almost be called an instantaneous pleasure with itself and its characteristics.

Despite all concepts to the contrary, energy is indeed at its basis, love. It is also composed of highly charged consciousness that operates almost in a leapfrog fashion, with great bursts of exuberance and vitality. The great — the greatest creative force — that force that is the origin for all physical life — did not suddenly appear once in some distant past, sparking the birth of or reality, endowing it with an energy that could only then run down, or dissipate. Instead at every conceivable point within our universal system.

Each new rose in the springtime is in truth a new rose, composed of completely new and unique energy, utterly itself, innocent, alive in the world.

In the deepest of terms, while each body has a history each moment in the body’s existence is also new, freshly emerging into the world, innocent and unique. While there is indeed pain in the world, it is the miraculous principle of pleasure that propels life itself.

Those who look upon physical life as inferior to some other more perfect spiritual existence do a great injustice to physical existence in general. Physical life is everywhere filled with the universal energy that is its source, so it can hardly be inferior to it’s own composition.

Again, corporeal reality is a brilliant segment of existence. It cannot be inferior to existence. It is because we so often view our world through a system of highly limited beliefs that we so often misread the implications of temporal life.

Such beliefs serve to limit our comprehension, until it seems often that physical life consists of a frantic struggle for survival at every level of consciousness. Such ideas certainly do not foster feelings of security, health, or well-being, and they distort the nature of our physical environment.

That environment is not something separate from ourselves, for us to control. Instead, us and the environment support, strengthen, and fortify each other in ways that often escapes us. All portions of the environment contain their own conditions, but of their relationships to all other portions of the world. They add to the world’s health in other words, and our own vitality — and that of our environment — are everywhere interrelated.

 

Inborn Cooperation

The picture of man, woman, animals, and nature depicted in movies, is the only possible portrayal of reality that could be logically shown, considering the beliefs upon which the premise rests.

The environment, man, woman and the animals are all characterized as ferocious, hostile to each other, each one determined to attain survival at the expense of the other. Man and woman could not have existed under the conditions fostered in most movies — nor for that matter could any of the animals. Despite any other theories to the contrary, the world, all of its physical aspects, and all of its creatures depends upon an inborn cooperation. The species do not compete with each other over a given territory, no matter how frequently that appears to be the case.

Science has promoted the idea that hostility is a constant attribute of nature and all of its parts, while it sees the cooperating characteristics of nature as rather infrequent or extraordinary — but certainly outside of the norm.

Even biologically on the most microscopic of levels, there is a vast inbred network of cooperating activity, and these unite the animals and mineral kingdoms with all the other aspects of earthly existence. Each organism has a purpose, and it is to fulfill its own capabilities in such a way that it benefits all other organisms.

Each organism is therefore helped in its development by each and every other organism, and the smooth operation of one contributes to the integrity of all. Men and women did not begin hunting animals until certain groups of animals needed a way to control their own population. As I have said before in previous blogs, men, women and animals learned from each other. They were immediate allies, not enemies.

Men and women also domesticated animals almost from the very first, so that men, women and animals both did each other a service — they worked together. The stability of planetary life depended above all upon this basic cooperation, in which all species pooled together.

Man’s and woman’s brain was always the size that it is now, and the animals existed in the forms by which we know them today. No animal — or virus — is truly extinct. All exist in an inner web-work, and are held in the memory of an overall earthly knowledge — one that is biological, so that each smallest microbe has within it the imprinted biological messages that form each and every other microbe. The existence of one presupposes that existence of all, and the existence of all is inherent in the existence of one.

In those early days men and women did live to ages that would amaze today — many living to be several hundred years old. This was indeed due to the fact that their knowledge was desperately needed, and their experience. They were held in veneration, and they cast their knowledge into songs and stories that were memorized throughout the years.

Beside this, however, their energy was utilized in a different fashion than ours is. They alternated between the waking and dream states, and while asleep they did not age as quickly. Their bodily processes slowed. Although this was true, their dreaming mental processes did not slow down. There was a much greater communication in the dream state, so that some lessons were taught during dreams, while others were taught in the waking condition.

There was a greater and greater body of knowledge to be transmitted as physical existence continued, for they did not transmit private knowledge only, but the entire body of knowledge that belonged to the group or tribe as a whole.

Now: our dreams represent the larger rooms of beliefs into which we are emerging. The many people, and connecting rooms, represent the new structure of vaster beliefs that are all interconnected while we are still, however, concentrating upon the private creative self, and from that viewpoint viewing the world — hence our private corner in which we paint, as from that corner of private creativity we view the large interacting structure of new beliefs.

The¬†Bible is a conglomeration of parables and stories, intermixed with some unclear memories of much earlier times .The bible that we recognize — or that is recognized — in not the first however, but was compiled from several earlier ones as man and woman tried to look back, so to speak, and recount his and her past and predict his and her future.

Such bibles existed, not written down but carried orally, as mentioned some time ago, by the Speakers. It was only much later that this information was written down, and by then, of course, much had been forgotten. This is apart from the fact of tampering, or downright misinformation as various factions used the material for their own ends.

The paternal feelings of our dreams, allow us to expand our experience while in the dream state. This also presents us with an example of the ways in which early man and woman expanded his and her own knowledge and experience in the dream state. In the same way, as mentioned in a previous blog, man and woman also had dream images of actual geographical locations to which he or she had not physically traveled.

The Body Consciousness

The body consciousness, on its own, is filled with exuberance, vitality, and creativity.

Each most microscopic portion of the body is conscious, strives toward its own goals of development, and is in communication with all other parts of the body. The body consciousness is indeed independent. To a large degree its own defense mechanisms protect it from the mind’s negative beliefs — at least to a large extent. As I have mentioned before in past blogs, almost all persons pass from so-called disease state back into healthy states without ever being aware of the alterations. In those cases the body consciousness operates unimpeded by negative expectations or concepts.

When those negative considerations are multiplied, however, when they harden, so to speak, then they do indeed begin to diminish the body’s own natural capacity to heal itself, and to maintain that overall, priceless organization that should maintain it in a condition of excellent strength and vitality.

There are also occasions when the body consciousness itself rises up in spite of a person’s fears and doubts, and throws aside a condition of illness in a kind of sudden victory. Even then, however, the person involved has already begun to question such negative beliefs. The individual may not know how to cast them off, even though he or she desires to do so. It is in those instances that the body consciousness arises and throws off its shackles.

With free will, however, it is not possible for the body consciousness to be given full and clear dominion, for that would deny large areas of choices, and cut off facets of learning. The main direction and portent, however, of the body consciousness on its own is always toward health, expression, and fulfillment.

The molecules, and even the smaller aspects of the body act and react, communicate, cooperate with each other, and share each other’s knowledge, so that on particle of the body knows what is happening in all the other parts. Thus, the amazing organization usually works in a smooth, natural fashion. Many body events that we think of in our society as negative –certain viruses, for example — are instead meant as self-corrective devices, even as fever actually promotes health rather than impedes it.

The main characteristic of bodily consciousness is its spontaneity. This allows it to work at an incredibly swift rate that could not be handled by the topmost conscious portions of the mind. Its operation is due to an almost instantaneous kind of consciousness, in which what is known, with no distance between, say, the knower and the known.

The act of seeing, and all of the body’s senses, are dependent upon this inner spontaneity.

Our “negative” dreams express left-over doubts and fears, and hold the concept that the poorest rather than the best outcome of any event will happen.

The Species Multitudinous Abilities

My human skill is as ancient as man and woman is, and indeed all of our arts, sciences, and cultural achievements are the offshoots of spontaneous mental and biological processes.

I choose my words quite carefully at times, because I realize the various interpretations that can be placed upon them. Perhaps the following explanation will express more clearly what I mean.

In the first place, as often mentioned lately, the reasoning mind is spontaneously fired. The species contains within itself all of the necessary spontaneous attributes that are necessary to form a civilization, for example. All of our reasoned activities — our governments, societies, arts, religions and sciences — are the physical realization, of course, of inner capacities, capacities that are inherent in man’s and woman’s structure. Take our theaters’ movie picture dramas. These are the materialization in our time of man’s and woman’s natural ability — a characteristic highly important in the behavior of the species.

Early man and woman, for example, spontaneously played at acting out the part of other animals. He and she took part of a tree, a brook, a rock. Acting became a teaching method — a way of passing on information. Man and woman always possessed all of the knowledge he or she needed. The task was to make it physically available.

People translate inner knowledge in many ways — through acting it out, through singing or dancing, through drawing images on cave walls. It was the intellect’s job to put such information to practical use, and thus the intuitions and the intellect worked hand in hand. Man and woman dealt then with spontaneous knowing in a more direct fashion.

It is very difficult to try to explain the various shadings of psychology that were involved. Early man and woman did act in a more spontaneous manner, more automatically, in our terms, but not mindlessly. If we remember the early blogs, then this information should fall into place, for consciousness emerged from the inside outward. Animals enjoy drama, and in their fashions they playact.

It was to man and woman to translate his and her inner information with a freehand. He or she is able to form many different kinds of cultures, for example. He or she puts his or her sciences and religions, his and her languages, together in multitudinous ways, but there must always be a translation of inner information outward to the world of sense, There still is. Man’s and woman’s capacities have not dimmed in the regard. Thinking, for example, is as automatic as ever. It is simply that our culture puts the various elements together in ways that stress the qualities of what we refer to as rational thinking.

When the species needs certain abilities, they rise to the fore, as in my case now. When we are painting pictures we are also translating inner knowledge. Early artists drew pictures to share the images they saw in their dreams. In a fashion they practiced dreaming in their sleep, and thus learned also to think in terms of the measurement of physical images, and to move objects around in their minds before they did so physically.

Poetry was an art and a science. It conveyed quite necessary information about man and woman and the universe. The same can be said of many cave drawings. What we had — what we still have, though we are not nearly as aware of it — was an excellent give-and-take between the inner and outer senses. Through chanting, dancing, playacting, painting, story-telling, man and woman spontaneously translated inner sense data into physical actualization. The physical senses only present us with clues as to our own sensitivities.

I translate what I feel without being consciously aware of receiving the material in usual terms, or of translating it. It has to be broken down, particularly to a time frame, and then into concepts that can take advantage of the world view that is held in our culture. Everything must be slanted to fit the viewpoint of creatures who believe most firmly in the superiority of matter over mind — who are immersed in a particular biological framework.

I cannot ignore those belief structures — or what I say would literally be incomprehensible. All of this is automatically  taken care of.

The species has multitudinous abilities, each necessary, each adding to the entire fulfillment and attributes of our people. Some individuals choose to specialize, following specific lines of abilities throughout many existences — accommodating these, however, to the times in which they are born. Both my wife and I have been speakers in that regard. The methods many change. We may “speak” through art or music, through trance activities, but we will specialize in the use of the inner senses, and in translating the inner knowledge of the species, bringing it to whatever level of ordinary consciousness that is considered the official one.

I know what sound is, my wife knows, what we consider sound is only one of sounds many spectrums. Beside translating inner images into paintings, for example, we may unknowingly be translating sensually invisible sounds into images. In a way quite impossible to describe, it would be true to say that my blogs actually translate multidimensional images into words. We have no words for the kinds of images I am speaking of, for they are not objects, nor pictures of objects, nor images of images, but instead the inner dimensions, each separate and glowing, but connected, prisms of knowledge, that have within themselves more reality than we can presently begin to imagine.

To a certain extent, I must travel from those mental realities into our comprehension, wrest myself free in order to form an ever-changing, ever-moving, ever-on-the-move entity that can blog here and be there mentally at the same time. So I am distant and close at once. That distance from my blog readers also represents the reaches, however, of the human psyche, and the vast corridors of psychological activity from which it is formed, and from which our world emerges.

For the worlds are so composed that each one is a part of each other one, and there is no disconnecting. There is no place or space, psychological, psychic, where those worlds exist apart from each other, so we cannot say that one is more highly evolved than another.

There are as many frontiers as there ever were, and there is no catastrophe that will annihilate consciousness, or put an end to earthly life. When we think in terms of earth’s destruction, or the ending of the world, we are thinking of course of a continuum of time, and of beginnings and endings. From our viewpoint in space and time, it seems that planets have come and gone, stars collapsed, and when we look outward into space, it appears that we look backward into time. There are great pulsations, however, in existence — pulsations that have nothing to do with time as we understand it, but with intensities.

In the deepest of terms, the world always was and always will be. It changes its patterns of activity, it comes and goes, but it is always itself in its comings and goings. To me, that is exceedingly simple — but as far as our concepts are concerned, it can seem to imply irreconcilable complications.

A small note to my blog readers– again — trust the great power of the universe that forms your own image, trust spontaneity, and the body’s natural urges toward relaxation, motion, and creativity, as these show themselves in their own rhythms.

The Daily Hypothesis

It would help all if we remind ourselves that our creative mind is at work whether or not we are aware of it, and regardless of what we are doing, and that such periods of dead time have the potential, at least, of accelerating creativity, if we allow our intellect to go into a kind of free drive at such times.

Each person has such a daily hypothesis — one that might be quite different for say, Friday than it is for Monday. We build our daily experience partially by such working hypotheses.

Many of the beliefs  that we have individually and jointly are somewhat relieved in the evening, in that they so often apply to the day’s activities, when the rest of the world seems to be engaged in the nine-to-five assembly-line world experience.

We do not project as many negative ideas upon the evening hours, and to same applies to most people to varying degrees. We are jointly free of limitations that might hamper us at other times of the day. We are  less visited by preconceptions of what we are supposed to do in any given hour of the day.

The natural, magical flows of our own rhythms are more often broken up in the daytime. This applies to many people as well, because of our ideas of what we should be doing at any given time, or what is socially respectable, proper, upright, even moral in limited terms.

We have settled upon a system that seems to be naturally based, the exclusive results of our historic past, one in which our main activities are daytime ones. It seems only natural that early man and woman, for example, carried on all of his and her main activities in the day, hiding after dark. As a matter of fact, however, early man and woman were a natural night dweller, and early developed the uses of fire for illumination, carrying on many activities after dark, when many natural predators slept. He and she also hunted very well in the dark, cleverly using all of his and her senses with high accuracy — the result of learning processes that are now quite lost.

In any case, man and woman were not by any means exclusively a daytime creature, and fires within caves extended activities far into the night. It was agriculture that turned him and her more into a daytime rhythm, and for some time many beliefs lingered that resulted from earlier nighttime agricultural practices.

Many people’s natural rhythms, then, still do incline in those directions, and they are always kept operable as alternate rhythms for the species as a whole.

I have some inclinations in that direction, as do many creative people, but these rhythms are often nearly completely overlaid by culturally-learned ones. Cultures that were night-oriented appreciated the night in a different fashion, of course, and actually utilized their consciousnesses in ways that are almost nearly forgotten. I believe there are ancient fairy tales and myths still surviving that speak of these underworlds, or worlds of darkness — but they do not mean worlds of death, as is usually interpreted.

 

In a fashion, the intellect goes hand-in-hand with the imagination under such conditions. It is not that man and woman stressed physical data less, but he and she put it together differently — that in the darkness he and she relied upon his and her inner and outer senses in a more unified fashion. The night portions of our personalities have become strangers to us — for as we identify with what we think of a our rational intellect, then we identify it further with the daytime hours, with the objective world that becomes visible in the morning, with the clear-cut physical objects that are then before our view.

In those times, however, man and woman identified more with his and her intuitive selves, and with his and her imagination, and these to some extent more than now, directed the uses to which he and she put his or her intellect.

This meant, of course, a language that was in its way more precise than our own, for concepts were routinely expressed that described the vast complexity of subjective as well as objective events. There were myriad relationships, for example, impossible now to describe, between a person and his of her dream selves, and between the dream selves of all the members of the tribe. Particularly in warmer climates, man and woman were naturally nocturnal, and did a good deal of his and her sleeping and dreaming in the daytime.

We must remember, of course, that the use of clocks is a fairly recent phenomenon. Men and women thought in terms of rhythms of the time, of flowing time, not of time in sections that were arbitrary. So as far as creature-hood is concerned, we have adapted to a time environment that we ourselves have formed. Creative people, again, are often aware of those connections, at least at certain levels, and I have in particular always felt this way to some extent. We have largely buried our own natural feelings in that direction.

These rhythms are also more natural to us than we suspect. We often have freedoms, then, that we do not use — a 24-hour period that we use quite arbitrarily, one that is already sectioned for us by society — but only if we allow it to be. It can be used in any fashion that we wish.

Relaxation and Effortlessness

It is true, of course, that before the time of modern psychology man and woman had a concept of himself and herself that dealt with conscious exterior aspects only, although it has been written that until that time man and woman thought of themselves as a kind of flat-surfaced self-minus, for example, subconscious or unconscious complexity.

Instead, previous to psychology’s entrance, before psychology mapped the acceptable or forbidden, the dangerous or safe compartments of the self, man and woman used the word “soul” to ¬†include his or her own entire complexity. The word was large enough to contain man’s and woman’s experience. It was large enough to provide room for conventional and unconventional, bizarre and ordinary states of mind and experience. It was roomy enough to hold images of reality that were physically perceived or psychologically perceived.

Now the church finally placed all of the condemnation of its religious laws against certain psychological and mystical experiences — not because it did not consider them realities, of course, but precisely because it recognized too well the disruptive influence that, say, revelationary experience could have upon a world order that was based upon a uniform dogma.

“Witches” were not considered insane, for example, or deranged, for their psychological beliefs fit in only too well with those of the general populace. They were considered evil instead. The vast range of psychological expression, however, had some kind of framework to contain it. The saint and the sinner each had access to great depths of possible heroism or despair. Psychological reality, for all of the religious dangers placed upon it, was anything but a flat-surfaced experience. It was in fact because the church so believe in the great range of psychological activity possible that it was so dogmatic and tireless in trying to maintain order.

Unfortunately, with the development of scientific era, a development occurred that need not have happened. As I have mentioned before, science’s determination to be objective almost immediately brought about a certain artificial shrinking of psychological reality. What could not be proven in laboratory was presumed not to exist at all.

Anyone who experienced “something that could not exist” was therefore to some extent or another deluded or deranged. There is no doubt that the accepted dimensions of psychological reality began to shrink precisely at the time that modern psychology began. Modern psychology was an attempt to make man and woman conform to the new scientific world view.

It was an attempt to fit man within the picture of evolution, and to manufacture a creature whose very existence was somehow pitted against itself. Evolutionary man and woman, with Darwinian roots, could not be a creature with a soul. It had to have hidden in its psychological roots the bloody remnants of the struggle for survival that now cast the soul in a position of stress, caught as it was between its heavenly source and original sin — but there was a sense of psychological mobility involved, one that saw continued existence after death.

The new psychology shut off mobility after death, while giving each individual an unsavory primitive past heritage — a heritage genetically carried, that led finally only to the grave. Psychological activity was scaled down in between life and death, then, even while the possibility of any after-death experience was considered the most unreasonable and unintellectual of speculations.

Any man or woman might rise in our democracy from a poor peasant’s son to be the President. Outcasts might become the socially prominent. The unlettered might become highly educated. The idea of achieving greatness, however, was considered highly suspect. The self was kept in bounds. Great passion, or desire or intent — or genius — did not fit the picture.

Now some peoples would not fit into that mold. They would take what they could from our technology, but in conscious and spontaneous ways they retaliated — and still do — by exaggerating all of those human tendencies that our society has held down so well. If we can have reason without faith, then indeed, for example, we will see that there can be faith without reason. When human experience becomes shrunken in such a fashion — compressed — then in a fashion it also explodes at both ends, one might say.

We have atrocious acts committed, along with great heroisms, but each are explosive, representing sudden releases of withheld energies that have in other ways been forbidden, and so man’s and woman’s mass psyche expresses itself sometimes like explosive fireworks, simply because the release of pressure is necessary.

Even our poor misguided moral/religious organization is saying in it’s fashion to the scientifically-oriented society: “How is faith not real, then? We’ll change your laws with it. We”ll turn it into power — political power. What will you say then? We have been laughed at for so long. We will see who laughs now.”

Fanaticism abounds, of course, because the human tendencies and experiences that have been denied by the mainline society erupt with explosive force, where the tendencies themselves must be accepted as characteristics of human experience. Iran is an example for the world, in explosive capsule form, complete with historical background and a modern political one. Modern psychology does not have a concept of the self to begin to explain such realities.

Now, in the world we early formed our own beliefs and strategies. In midlife we are presented with a recognized overall vitality of materials. This is mean to reorient our attitudes. Some don’t realize, that we are not merely being presented with an alternate view of reality, but with the closet approximation we could get of what reality is, and how it worked, and what it meant.

I have been very gentle in my treatment of our mores and institutions — for I do not want to be against our world, but for a more fulfilling one. In future blogs I will be discussing how our ideas can be applied by the individual in terms of value fulfillment, so that individuals can begin to reclaim those dimensions of experience that are indeed our right heritage.

For my blog readers, I want them to remember the idea of effortlessness, because with the best of intentions some have been trying too hard. I want them to remember that relaxation is one of creativity’s greatest champions — not its enemy. He or she is naturally gifted with the quickness of body and mind. Remind oneself that it is safe to express his or her natural rhythms, to remember the natural person. Our most vital inspirations are effortlessly ours. I want us to see how many of our beliefs are the result of the old framework, for in that way we will find ourselves releasing ourselves ore and more, so the our own strengths come to our support.

 

Desire as Action

To the world of the intellect, a glass door must be considered solid, as it is in the world of physical senses. In other quite as factual terms, indeed in the larger frameworks of facts, the door of course is not solid at all, as no objects are. Obviously that is known to science.

Science delegates the world of nature as the realm of exterior natural events. Its view of nature is therefore mechanistic. The natural self, however, like the rest of nature, possesses a rich dimension of inside psychological depth, that science, because of its own definitions, cannot perceive. Telepathy and clairvoyance, for example, are a part of natural effects, but they belong to a nature so much more expansive than science’s definitions that they have been made to appear as highly unnatural eccentricities of behavior rather than as natural components of consciousness.

It is also for that reason that they seem to fall outside of the realm of the s-a-n-e. Such characteristics are, however, basic properties of the natural person. They do not appear very well under the auspices of the scientific method, because the scientific method is itself programmed to perceive only information that fits into its preconceived patterns. Such abilities appear to be unpredictable, discontinuous, only because we are so relatively unaware of what is actually quite constant psychological behavior. That is, such abilities operate so smoothly, so continuously, and with such ease that we become aware of them only under certain conditions. We are aware of what seem to be isolated hints of odd characteristics.

The intellect is basically able to handle many kinds of information, and information systems. It is far more flexible that we presently allow it to be. It can handle several main world views at once, realizing that they are each methods of perceiving and approaching reality. To some degree historically speaking, that sort of situation operated in the past when — comparatively speaking, now — people realized that there was indeed an inner world of complexity and richness that could be approached in certain fashions, one that existed alongside with the physical world, so that the two intersected. Certain approaches worked in one area, and others worked in the inner reality.

The intellect could handle both approaches, operating with separate assumptions. There were separate assumptions that applied to different realities. I do not mean to idealize those times. In so-called modern ages, however, the intellect has been stripped down, so to speak. Science perceived the spectacular complexity of exterior reality, but turned its sights completely away from any recognition — any at all — until regarded subjectivity itself as a mere throw-away product, accidentally formed by a mindless matter.

All of this applies to our situation, for I want you to thoroughly understand, intellectually and emotionally, the errors of current thought, so that we can see that our material is indeed providing us not only with “creative material,” but with a more factual presentation of the framework in which we have our existence.

In modern times, then, the intellect was finally left with only one acceptable world view, with one set of assumptions, with only one main approach to reality and experience. The acceptable assumptions to a large extent ran directly contradictory to built-in biological, spiritual, and psychological assumptions that are a part of man’s and woman’s heritage. The intellect does try to order experience, to make sense out of perception. When it is enriched by having in its possession several world views, then it does an excellent job of merging those into meaningful patterns, of sorting information and sending it to the proper places, so to speak.

It understands, for example, that clairvoyant material is a part of the personality’s overall characteristics, so it is not afraid of perceiving it — and it is able to separate such information confusion from present physical sense perception. Orderliness, then, is one of its main characteristics. When it is given only one world view, and only one group of assumptions, its orderly nature causes it to throw out all information that does not fit. It is almost forced to make an orderly picture, say like a jigsaw puzzle picture, while being denied half of the pieces.

The intellect is not to blame. It does the best it can under those conditions.

Now in our dreams, we are quite clearly seeing the threshold between physical reality and the magical dimension in which that physical reality has its source. We are being shown — or showing ourselves — the difference in the rules or assumptions between the two. The dog’s desire for food led him to walk magically through the door, for the desires of the natural creature are satisfied with an ease that has nothing to do with our ideas of work. What I am getting at is the introduction of the concepts of a different kind of work — very valuable, vital work that is performed at another level and in a different fashion.

A prime example, of course, is the “work” done to keep each and every creature alive and breathing, the “work” done to keep the planets in their places, the “work” being done so that one evolutionist can meditate over his or her theories.

Now in our dreams we get the feeling of that kind of work, or action. It is the given power of the world, the given power of nature. It is the directed force of value fulfillment. In other terms it is of course the energy of All That Is. The trouble is that the rational view of life has separated man and woman from a sense of his or her own power source. When he or she have a problem, the rational approach to its solution seems the only answer, and often, of course, it is no answer at all.

I want to make sure that I am right. I try to go ahead and not go ahead at the same time. I try to be daring and cautious, brave and safe. This applies to some extent to each of us, of course, precisely because we are gifted strongly both intellectually and intuitively. We try rationalize our creativity, to some extent. The rational line of thought finds creativity highly disruptive, so in those terms as highly gifted creative people, we would have encountered some difficulties in any case.

It is time that we regarded such difficulties instead as challenges that are a part of a creative adventure that we have ourselves chosen. We chose the adventure because it is the kind best suited to our own individual value fulfillment. In reconciling the many concepts and contradictions for ourselves, we also lead the way for many others. It would, again, help considerably if we thought of our work more as an adventure, an exciting creative adventure, than of work in our old terms.

This will allow us to include the feeling of inner, magical “work” in our calculations. It would also begin to give us a feeling for the magical support that upholds us, and our lives — the support that we can count upon, and that can bring about the solution to our physical difficulties. Here, the vital word is ease of effortlessness. If we want to feed a dog in the physical world — and he or she is on the other side of the door — we must open it. In the inner world we or the dog can walk through the door without effort, because desire is action. Desire is action.

In the inner world, our desires bring about their own fulfillment, effortlessly. That inner world, and the exterior one, intersect and interweave. They only appear separate. In the physical world, time may have to elapse, or whatever. Conditions may have to change, or whatever, but the desire will bring about the proper results. The feeling of effortlessness is what is important. It is quite proper for our intellect to understand this, and to say, simply now, ” That is not my realm. I will leave the solution to that problem where it belongs. We will use the magical approach here.”

Of course, an entire reorientation is instead implied, and that entire reorientation will effortlessly bring about a new relationship in our bodies and our lives, and with the adventure we embark upon. We will simply automatically get better, because the framework will allow us to do so.

Within our time scheme each physically-endowed consciousness, whatever its form or size or complexity, inherently seeks to fulfill its own highest potential — not only for itself, but for the benefit of each other such consciousness in our reality. There is no drifting through life, then, but a built-in search for the fulfillment of values, whatever possible successes, conflicts, or failures may be involved, and no matter how modest or great or complex any of those qualities may be. The ecstasy and love of being always operate to ensure the quality and growth of life’s existence through value fulfillment.

All Other Species Preserve Nature, While Man and Woman Has a Propensity for Destroying It

I have myself heard it said that other creatures behave with a natural grace, save man and woman. I have myself heard it said that all of nature is content unto itself save man and woman, who is filled with discontent. Such thoughts follow “naturally” the dictums of so-called rational thought. When we think such thoughts, we think of them at the most strained level of intellectual speculation — that is, the thoughts seem self-evident to the intellect that is forced to operate by itself, relatively speaking, divorced from the self’s other faculties. It then does indeed seem that man and woman is somehow apart from nature — or worse, an ungrateful blight, almost a parasite, upon the face of the planet.

That view itself is a symptom of the intellect’s difficulty. In the position in which our culture places the intellect, it does see itself quite alone, separated both from other portions of the personalities, from other creatures, and from nature itself. Therefore science, for example, says that creatures — except for man and woman — operate by blind instinct, and that term is meant to explain all of the complicated behavior of the other species. Therefore the gulf between man and woman and animals, the intellect and nature, seems to deepen.

In those terms, it is quite as truthful to say that man’s and woman’s intellect is also instinctive. He or she begins thinking at once. He and she cannot help but use his or her intellect. The intellect, again, operates magically, spontaneously, automatically. It’s most keen reasoning processes rise as a result of that natural magical action.

The intellect has been taught to divorce itself from its source. It realizes in that regard a sense of powerlessness, for to some extent it is philosophically cut off from its own source of power. When it looks, therefore, at world of political events, the problems seem insoluble. Man and woman makes decisions that may seem quite wrong to the intellect because of its belief systems, and because it is so cut off from other sources of information. A goodly number of those mistaken decisions, or “poor moves,” often represent self-corrective actions, decisions taken on knowledge not consciously perceived, but this escapes our consciousness.

In the same way, some private-life decisions or events may appear disadvantageous to the intellect for the same reasons, while instead they are also self-corrective measures that we are not able to perceive because of our beliefs. The rational approach, as it is now used, carries a basic assumption that anything that is wrong will get worse. That belief of course is highly detrimental because it runs against the basic principles of life. Were this the case in our terms of history, the world would never have lasted a century. It is interesting to note that even before medical science, there were a goodly number of healthy populations. No disease rubbed out the entire species.

When we believe that the worst will happen we must always be on guard. In our culture people use the term “intellect” almost like a weapon to protect themselves against impending disaster. They must be alert for dangers of all kinds. They begin to collect evidence of danger so that any other kind of orientation to life seems foolhardy, and to be a realist means in that framework to look out for the worst.

First of all, if we realize that the intellect itself is a part of nature, a part of the natural person, a part of magical processes, then we need not overstrain it, force it to feel isolated, or put it in a position in which paranoid tendencies develop. It is itself supported, as our intuitions are, by life’s magical processes. It is supported by the greater energy that gave us and the world birth. That power is working in the world, and in the world of politics, as it is in the working of nature, since we make that distinction.

When we follow that so-called rational approach, however, we are bound to feel threatened, divorced from our body. Our thoughts and our body seem separate. Divisions seem to appear between the mental and the physical, where again each are supported by those magical processes. That rational approach goes against what I can only call life’s directives and life’s natural rhythms. It is contradictory to biological integrity, and again, it does not make sense.

That rational approach is, of course, connected now with scientific ideas mentioned earlier: life surrounded by chaos, the struggle for survival, and so forth. I do not mean to put down the intellect. It is highly important, but it is, if you will forgive me, as natural as a cat’s whiskers. It is not some adjunct to nature, but a part it.

The magical approach takes is for granted, in the simplest terms, that the life of any individual will fulfill itself, will develop and mature, that the environment and the individual are uniquely suited and work together. This sounds very simple. In verbal terms, however, those are the beliefs of each cell. They are imprinted in each chromosome, in each atom. they provide a built-in faith that pervades each living creature, each snail, each hair on our head. Those ingrained beliefs are, of course, biologically pertinent, providing the impetus of all growth and development.

Each cell believes in a better tomorrow. I am, I admit, personifying our cell here, but the statement has a firm truth. Furthermore, each cell contains within itself a belief and an understanding of its own inevitability. It knows it lives beyond its death, in other words.

The idea of heaven, for all of its distortions, has operated as a theoretical framework, assuring the intellect of its survival. Science has believed to the contrary in the utter annihilation of the intellect after death, and since man and woman had by then placed all of his or her identification with the intellect, this was a shattering blow to it. It denied man and woman a necessary biological imperative.

All of these reasons lie beneath men’s and women’s mass problems, and apply in each life.  I feel I have never learned to use the power of reason, and instead trust every stray thought that comes into my head. So to doubt myself is protective.

I also feel that the questioning power of the intellect is not just one of its functions –which it is — but is primary purpose, which it is not. In our terms the intellect’s primary function is to make clear deductions and distinctions involving the personality’s relationship with the world. Our society, however, has indeed considered the rational approach to be the masculine-favored one — so I have an additional reason in that regard to be such a proponent of the rational approach. All of the beliefs connected with the sex were of course erroneous, but they are part and parcel of the “rational” framework itself.

It is certainly too simple to say what I am going to say, yet it is almost as if we would be better off turning the entire rational approach upside down, taking it for granted that all of its assumptions were false, for they are indeed more false than true. Again, the result of highly spontaneous processes of which it itself knows nothing, and the intuitions that are considered so undisciplined and unreasonable are based upon calculations far more spectacular than those of which the conscious mind can conceive. The intellect could not follow them, so the distinctions are not basic: They are the result of beliefs and habitual usage. Therefore, of course, I speak of them separately, as we think of them.

The magical approach takes it for granted that the human being is a united creature, fulfilling purposes in nature even as the animals do, whether or not those purposes are understood. The magical approach takes it for granted that each individual has a future, a fulfilling one, even though death may be tomorrow. The magical approach takes it for granted that the means for development are within each individual, and that fulfillment will happen naturally. Overall, that approach operates in our world. If it did not, there would be no world. If the worst was bound to happen, as the scientists certainly think, even evolution, in their terms, would have been impossible, of course.

You needed this background, for I want to build up the atmosphere in which this magical approach can be comprehended. Then specific material can be utilized.

In our dreams we are, of course, in the process of forming new ideas about the nature of the magical self and also in our way working that idea out through imagery. The dreams are above all an example of “work” being done at other levels of awareness.

All of these experiences are indications of the exquisite kind of reasoning that goes on at the levels of awareness that are usually considered unreasonable. That kind of material enriches the intellect and reassures it.

Certain portions of the personality or psyche must very shrewdly and carefully construct dreams in advance, so that when the dreams are played back they render just the right message to the parts of the psyche that need it. I’m not being contradictory here when I write that the dream is a spontaneous production, also.
Continue reading All Other Species Preserve Nature, While Man and Woman Has a Propensity for Destroying It

The Human Magic Show

What magicians we are,

turning darkness into light,

transforming invisible atoms into the dazzling theater

of the world,

pulling objects,

(people as well

as rabbits)

out of secret

microscopic closets,

turning winter into summer,

making a palmful of moments

disappear through time’s trap door.

 

We learned the methods

so long ago

that they’re unconscious,

and we’ve hypnotized ourselves

into believing

that we’re the audience,

so I wonder where we served

our apprenticeship.

Under what master magicians did we learn

to form reality

so smoothly that we forgot to tell ourselves

the secret?

Normal Dreams

I believe that normal dreams are the outside shell of deeper inside experience. The interior reality is clothed in dream images as, when we are awake, it is clothed in physical ones. Dream objects and physical objects alike are symbols by which we perceive — and distort — an inner reality that we do not seem able to experience directly. In certain states of consciousness, particularly in projections from the dream state, we achieve a peculiar poise of alertness. This lets us briefly examine the nature of our consciousness by allowing us to view its products — the events and experiences that it creates when released from usual physical focus.

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Consciousness forms its own reality, physical and otherwise. I think there is a “mass” dream experience, however, as there is a collectively perceived physical life and definite interior conditions within which dream life happens. Only inner experimentation will let us discover this interior landscape. Perhaps one day we will move freely within it, alert, conscious and far wiser than we are now.

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It is a dimension native to consciousness, I believe, at whatever stage of being, physical or nonphysical. We have our primary existence in it after death and spend a good deal of physical time wandering through it, unknowingly, in sleep. Clues as to our creativity and the nature of our existence can be found there and from it emerges the organizational qualities of normal consciousness as we know it.

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I do not believe that there are any more dangers facing us in the interior universe than there are in the physical one. We should explore each world with common sense and courage. The interior universe is the source of the exterior one, however, and traveling through it we will encounter our own hopes, fears and beliefs in their ever-changing form.

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And so the exterior emerges from the interior one even as this physical blog materialized from the inner reality of inspiration, creativity and dreams.

 

Basic Reality in The Dream, Hallucination and Objects

We will sometimes automatically translate this reality into physical terms. Such images will be hallucinatory, but it may take awhile for us to distinguish their true nature. It must be understood, however, that all physical objects are hallucinatory. They may be called mass hallucination.

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There is constant translation of inner reality into objects in the waking state and a constant translation of ideas into pseudo-objects in the dream state. Within a certain range of dream reality, ideas and thoughts can be translated into pseudo-objects and transported. This is what happens when we adopt a pseudo-form in projection, though I am simplifying this considerably.

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When we travel beyond a certain range of intensities, even pseudo-objects must vanish. They exist in a cluster about, and connected to, our own system. The lack of these, obviously, means that we have gone beyond our own camouflage system. If it were possible, we would then travel through a range of intensities in which no camouflage of the next system. This would or would not encounter the heart of the camouflage area. The completely un-camouflaged areas at the outer edges of the various systems should remind us of the undifferentiated areas between various life cycles in the subconscious. This is no coincidence.

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As a rule, we see, there is little communication within the un-camouflaged areas. They act as boundaries, even while they represent the basic stuff of which all camouflage is composed. (Without the camouflage, we would perceive nothing with the physical senses.)

The sentence is really meaningless, however, because the physical senses are themselves camouflage. There would be nothing to translate. It is only the inner senses that will allow us to perceive under these circumstances. Theoretically, if we can bridge the gap between our system and another.

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Once more: The undifferentiated layers are composed of the vitality that forms the camouflage of all systems. Such an area is not really a thing in itself, but a portion of vitality that contains no camouflage, and is therefore unrecognizable to those within any given system. We are in touch with infinity in such areas, since it is only camouflage that gives us the conception of time.

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Now, during some projections, we may be aware of nothing as far as surroundings are concerned. There will only be the mobility of our own consciousness. If this occurs, we will be traveling through such an un-camouflaged area. We could then expect to encounter next a more differentiated environment, that seems to become clearer as we progress toward the heart of another system.

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The completely un-camouflaged layer would be rather bewildering. We might automatically be tempered to project images into it. They would not take, so to speak, but would appear and disappear with great rapidity. This is a silent area. thoughts would not be perceived here, as a rule, for the symbols for them would not be understood.

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If a certain intensity is reached, however — a peak of intensity — then we would perceive the spacious present as it exists within our native system. We could, from this peak, look into other systems, but we would not understand what we perceived, not having the proper root assumptions. I have used the idea of neighboring systems for simplicity’s sake, as if they were laid out end to end. Obviously, such is not the case. The systems of reality are more like the various segments of a tangerine, with the un-camouflaged boundary areas like the white membrane between the tangerine sections.

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The tangerine, then, would be compared to a group of many systems, yet it would represent in itself but one portion of an unperceived whole. The tangerine would be but one segment of a larger system. We can see, then, why some projections would lead us in a far different direction from our linear sort of travel and why time as we know it would be meaningless.

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Nor do such projections necessarily involve journeys through space as we know it. There are systems, vivid in intensity, that have no existence in physical reality at all. It is now thought, I believe, that time and space are basically one, but they are both a part of something else. They are merely the camouflage patterns by which we perceive reality. Space as we perceive it in the dream state comes much closer to the reality.

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Projections within our own system will, of course, involve us with some kind of camouflage. If none is present, we will know we are out of the system. The dream universe is obviously closely connected with our own, since pseudo-objects are present. Even there, we are to some extent free from the space-time elements of our own system. Within the dream state, then, we are in the ‘outward’ areas of the physically oriented universe.

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One point: There are other systems all about and within our own. The undifferentiated areas move out like spirals, through all reality. Little resistance is encountered with them. They represent inner roads that connect systems, as well as divide them. The traveler must leave his or her own camouflage.

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It is possible, theoretically, to travel to any system in this manner and bypass others, you see. Such a traveler would not age physically. His or her body would be in a suspended state. Only a very few individuals have traveled in this manner. Most of the knowledge gained escape the ego, and the experience cannot be translated by the physical brain.

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However, it is possible to travel under such circumstances, and some of the data would be retained by inner portions of the self. In a creative individual, some of this information might be symbolically expressed in a painting or other work of art.

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Each brushstroke of a painting represents concentrated experience and compressed perceptions. In a good painting, these almost explode when perceived by the lively consciousness of another. The observer is washed over by the intensities. The excellent work of art recreates for the observer inner experience of his or her own, also, of which he or she has never been aware. As we know, paintings have motion, yet the painting itself does not move. This idea should help understand experience in terms of intensities and projections or the movement of consciousness without necessarily motion through space.

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True motion has nothing to do with space. The only real motion is that of the traveling consciousness.

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These dimensions as we know it, and I believe that in them we exercise abilities that are ours by right and heritage.