The Species Multitudinous Abilities

My human skill is as ancient as man and woman is, and indeed all of our arts, sciences, and cultural achievements are the offshoots of spontaneous mental and biological processes.

I choose my words quite carefully at times, because I realize the various interpretations that can be placed upon them. Perhaps the following explanation will express more clearly what I mean.

In the first place, as often mentioned lately, the reasoning mind is spontaneously fired. The species contains within itself all of the necessary spontaneous attributes that are necessary to form a civilization, for example. All of our reasoned activities — our governments, societies, arts, religions and sciences — are the physical realization, of course, of inner capacities, capacities that are inherent in man’s and woman’s structure. Take our theaters’ movie picture dramas. These are the materialization in our time of man’s and woman’s natural ability — a characteristic highly important in the behavior of the species.

Early man and woman, for example, spontaneously played at acting out the part of other animals. He and she took part of a tree, a brook, a rock. Acting became a teaching method — a way of passing on information. Man and woman always possessed all of the knowledge he or she needed. The task was to make it physically available.

People translate inner knowledge in many ways — through acting it out, through singing or dancing, through drawing images on cave walls. It was the intellect’s job to put such information to practical use, and thus the intuitions and the intellect worked hand in hand. Man and woman dealt then with spontaneous knowing in a more direct fashion.

It is very difficult to try to explain the various shadings of psychology that were involved. Early man and woman did act in a more spontaneous manner, more automatically, in our terms, but not mindlessly. If we remember the early blogs, then this information should fall into place, for consciousness emerged from the inside outward. Animals enjoy drama, and in their fashions they playact.

It was to man and woman to translate his and her inner information with a freehand. He or she is able to form many different kinds of cultures, for example. He or she puts his or her sciences and religions, his and her languages, together in multitudinous ways, but there must always be a translation of inner information outward to the world of sense, There still is. Man’s and woman’s capacities have not dimmed in the regard. Thinking, for example, is as automatic as ever. It is simply that our culture puts the various elements together in ways that stress the qualities of what we refer to as rational thinking.

When the species needs certain abilities, they rise to the fore, as in my case now. When we are painting pictures we are also translating inner knowledge. Early artists drew pictures to share the images they saw in their dreams. In a fashion they practiced dreaming in their sleep, and thus learned also to think in terms of the measurement of physical images, and to move objects around in their minds before they did so physically.

Poetry was an art and a science. It conveyed quite necessary information about man and woman and the universe. The same can be said of many cave drawings. What we had — what we still have, though we are not nearly as aware of it — was an excellent give-and-take between the inner and outer senses. Through chanting, dancing, playacting, painting, story-telling, man and woman spontaneously translated inner sense data into physical actualization. The physical senses only present us with clues as to our own sensitivities.

I translate what I feel without being consciously aware of receiving the material in usual terms, or of translating it. It has to be broken down, particularly to a time frame, and then into concepts that can take advantage of the world view that is held in our culture. Everything must be slanted to fit the viewpoint of creatures who believe most firmly in the superiority of matter over mind — who are immersed in a particular biological framework.

I cannot ignore those belief structures — or what I say would literally be incomprehensible. All of this is automatically  taken care of.

The species has multitudinous abilities, each necessary, each adding to the entire fulfillment and attributes of our people. Some individuals choose to specialize, following specific lines of abilities throughout many existences — accommodating these, however, to the times in which they are born. Both my wife and I have been speakers in that regard. The methods many change. We may “speak” through art or music, through trance activities, but we will specialize in the use of the inner senses, and in translating the inner knowledge of the species, bringing it to whatever level of ordinary consciousness that is considered the official one.

I know what sound is, my wife knows, what we consider sound is only one of sounds many spectrums. Beside translating inner images into paintings, for example, we may unknowingly be translating sensually invisible sounds into images. In a way quite impossible to describe, it would be true to say that my blogs actually translate multidimensional images into words. We have no words for the kinds of images I am speaking of, for they are not objects, nor pictures of objects, nor images of images, but instead the inner dimensions, each separate and glowing, but connected, prisms of knowledge, that have within themselves more reality than we can presently begin to imagine.

To a certain extent, I must travel from those mental realities into our comprehension, wrest myself free in order to form an ever-changing, ever-moving, ever-on-the-move entity that can blog here and be there mentally at the same time. So I am distant and close at once. That distance from my readers also represents the reaches, however, of the human psyche, and the vast corridors of psychological activity from which it is formed, and from which our world emerges.

For the worlds are so composed that each one is a part of each other one, and there is no disconnecting. There is no place or space, psychological, psychic, where those worlds exist apart from each other, so we cannot say that one is more highly evolved than another.

There are as many frontiers as there ever were, and there is no catastrophe that will annihilate consciousness, or put an end to earthly life. When we think in terms of earth’s destruction, or the ending of the world, we are thinking of course of a continuum of time, and of beginnings and endings. From our viewpoint in space and time, it seems that planets have come and gone, stars collapsed, and when we look outward into space, it appears that we look backward into time. There are great pulsations, however, in existence — pulsations that have nothing to do with time as we understand it, but with intensities.

In the deepest of terms, the world always was and always will be. It changes its patterns of activity, it comes and goes, but it is always itself in its comings and goings. To me, that is exceedingly simple — but as far as our concepts are concerned, it can seem to imply irreconcilable complications.

A small note to my blog readers– again — trust the great power of the universe that forms our own image, trust spontaneity, and the body’s natural urges toward relaxation, motion, and creativity, as these show themselves in their own rhythms.

 

 

The Daily Hypothesis

It would help all if we remind ourselves that our creative mind is at work whether or not we are aware of it, and regardless of what we are doing, and that such periods of dead time have the potential, at least, of accelerating creativity, if we allow our intellect to go into a kind of free drive at such times.

Each person has such a daily hypothesis — one that might be quite different for say, Friday than it is for Monday. We build our daily experience partially by such working hypotheses.

Many of the beliefs  that we have individually and jointly are somewhat relieved in the evening, in that they so often apply to the day’s activities, when the rest of the world seems to be engaged in the nine-to-five assembly-line world experience.

We do not project as many negative ideas upon the evening hours, and to same applies to most people to varying degrees. We are jointly free of limitations that might hamper us at other times of the day. We are  less visited by preconceptions of what we are supposed to do in any given hour of the day.

The natural, magical flows of our own rhythms are more often broken up in the daytime. This applies to many people as well, because of our ideas of what we should be doing at any given time, or what is socially respectable, proper, upright, even moral in limited terms.

We have settled upon a system that seems to be naturally based, the exclusive results of our historic past, one in which our main activities are daytime ones. It seems only natural that early man and woman, for example, carried on all of his and her main activities in the day, hiding after dark. As a matter of fact, however, early man and woman were a natural night dweller, and early developed the uses of fire for illumination, carrying on many activities after dark, when many natural predators slept. He and she also hunted very well in the dark, cleverly using all of his and her senses with high accuracy — the result of learning processes that are now quite lost.

In any case, man and woman were not by any means exclusively a daytime creature, and fires within caves extended activities far into the night. It was agriculture that turned him and her more into a daytime rhythm, and for some time many beliefs lingered that resulted from earlier nighttime agricultural practices.

Many people’s natural rhythms, then, still do incline in those directions, and they are always kept operable as alternate rhythms for the species as a whole.

I have some inclinations in that direction, as do many creative people, but these rhythms are often nearly completely overlaid by culturally-learned ones. Cultures that were night-oriented appreciated the night in a different fashion, of course, and actually utilized their consciousnesses in ways that are almost nearly forgotten. I believe there are ancient fairy tales and myths still surviving that speak of these underworlds, or worlds of darkness — but they do not mean worlds of death, as is usually interpreted.

 

In a fashion, the intellect goes hand-in-hand with the imagination under such conditions. It is not that man and woman stressed physical data less, but he and she put it together differently — that in the darkness he and she relied upon his and her inner and outer senses in a more unified fashion. The night portions of our personalities have become strangers to us — for as we identify with what we think of a our rational intellect, then we identify it further with the daytime hours, with the objective world that becomes visible in the morning, with the clear-cut physical objects that are then before our view.

In those times, however, man and woman identified more with his and her intuitive selves, and with his and her imagination, and these to some extent more than now, directed the uses to which he and she put his or her intellect.

This meant, of course, a language that was in its way more precise than our own, for concepts were routinely expressed that described the vast complexity of subjective as well as objective events. There were myriad relationships, for example, impossible now to describe, between a person and his of her dream selves, and between the dream selves of all the members of the tribe. Particularly in warmer climates, man and woman were naturally nocturnal, and did a good deal of his and her sleeping and dreaming in the daytime.

We must remember, of course, that the use of clocks is a fairly recent phenomenon. Men and women thought in terms of rhythms of the time, of flowing time, not of time in sections that were arbitrary. So as far as creature-hood is concerned, we have adapted to a time environment that we ourselves have formed. Creative people, again, are often aware of those connections, at least at certain levels, and I have in particular always felt this way to some extent. We have largely buried our own natural feelings in that direction.

These rhythms are also more natural to us than we suspect. We often have freedoms, then, that we do not use — a 24-hour period that we use quite arbitrarily, one that is already sectioned for us by society — but only if we allow it to be. It can be used in any fashion that we wish.

Relaxation and Effortlessness

It is true, of course, that before the time of modern psychology man and woman had a concept of himself and herself that dealt with conscious exterior aspects only, although it has been written that until that time man and woman thought of themselves as a kind of flat-surfaced self-minus, for example, subconscious or unconscious complexity.

Instead, previous to psychology’s entrance, before psychology mapped the acceptable or forbidden, the dangerous or safe compartments of the self, man and woman used the word “soul” to  include his or her own entire complexity. The word was large enough to contain man’s and woman’s experience. It was large enough to provide room for conventional and unconventional, bizarre and ordinary states of mind and experience. It was roomy enough to hold images of reality that were physically perceived or psychologically perceived.

Now the church finally placed all of the condemnation of its religious laws against certain psychological and mystical experiences — not because it did not consider them realities, of course, but precisely because it recognized too well the disruptive influence that, say, revelationary experience could have upon a world order that was based upon a uniform dogma.

“Witches” were not considered insane, for example, or deranged, for their psychological beliefs fit in only too well with those of the general populace. They were considered evil instead. The vast range of psychological expression, however, had some kind of framework to contain it. The saint and the sinner each had access to great depths of possible heroism or despair. Psychological reality, for all of the religious dangers placed upon it, was anything but a flat-surfaced experience. It was in fact because the church so believe in the great range of psychological activity possible that it was so dogmatic and tireless in trying to maintain order.

Unfortunately, with the development of scientific era, a development occurred that need not have happened. As I have mentioned before, science’s determination to be objective almost immediately brought about a certain artificial shrinking of psychological reality. What could not be proven in laboratory was presumed not to exist at all.

Anyone who experienced “something that could not exist” was therefore to some extent or another deluded or deranged. There is no doubt that the accepted dimensions of psychological reality began to shrink precisely at the time that modern psychology began. Modern psychology was an attempt to make man and woman conform to the new scientific world view.

It was an attempt to fit man within the picture of evolution, and to manufacture a creature whose very existence was somehow pitted against itself. Evolutionary man and woman, with Darwinian roots, could not be a creature with a soul. It had to have hidden in its psychological roots the bloody remnants of the struggle for survival that now cast the soul in a position of stress, caught as it was between its heavenly source and original sin — but there was a sense of psychological mobility involved, one that saw continued existence after death.

The new psychology shut off mobility after death, while giving each individual an unsavory primitive past heritage — a heritage genetically carried, that led finally only to the grave. Psychological activity was scaled down in between life and death, then, even while the possibility of any after-death experience was considered the most unreasonable and unintellectual of speculations.

Any man or woman might rise in our democracy from a poor peasant’s son to be the President. Outcasts might become the socially prominent. The unlettered might become highly educated. The idea of achieving greatness, however, was considered highly suspect. The self was kept in bounds. Great passion, or desire or intent — or genius — did not fit the picture.

Now some peoples would not fit into that mold. They would take what they could from our technology, but in conscious and spontaneous ways they retaliated — and still do — by exaggerating all of those human tendencies that our society has held down so well. If we can have reason without faith, then indeed, for example, we will see that there can be faith without reason. When human experience becomes shrunken in such a fashion — compressed — then in a fashion it also explodes at both ends, one might say.

We have atrocious acts committed, along with great heroisms, but each are explosive, representing sudden releases of withheld energies that have in other ways been forbidden, and so man’s and woman’s mass psyche expresses itself sometimes like explosive fireworks, simply because the release of pressure is necessary.

Even our poor misguided moral/religious organization is saying in it’s fashion to the scientifically-oriented society: “How is faith not real, then? We’ll change your laws with it. We”ll turn it into power — political power. What will you say then? We have been laughed at for so long. We will see who laughs now.”

Fanaticism abounds, of course, because the human tendencies and experiences that have been denied by the mainline society erupt with explosive force, where the tendencies themselves must be accepted as characteristics of human experience. Iran is an example for the world, in explosive capsule form, complete with historical background and a modern political one. Modern psychology does not have a concept of the self to begin to explain such realities.

Now, in the world we early formed our own beliefs and strategies. In midlife we are presented with a recognized overall vitality of materials. This is mean to reorient our attitudes. Some don’t realize, that we are not merely being presented with an alternate view of reality, but with the closet approximation we could get of what reality is, and how it worked, and what it meant.

I have been very gentle in my treatment of our mores and institutions — for I do not want to be against our world, but for a more fulfilling one. In future blogs I will be discussing how our ideas can be applied by the individual in terms of value fulfillment, so that individuals can begin to reclaim those dimensions of experience that are indeed our right heritage.

For my blog readers, I want them to remember the idea of effortlessness, because with the best of intentions some have been trying too hard. I want them to remember that relaxation is one of creativity’s greatest champions — not its enemy. He or she is naturally gifted with the quickness of body and mind. Remind oneself that it is safe to express his or her natural rhythms, to remember the natural person. Our most vital inspirations are effortlessly ours. I want us to see how many of our beliefs are the result of the old framework, for in that way we will find ourselves releasing ourselves ore and more, so the our own strengths come to our support.